What is the “envelope rule” at the Ryder Cup?

Ryder Cup Trophy Envelope Rule

With the latest edition of the Ryder Cup set to take place this month, and with all of the uncertainty caused by COVID-19, there's an outside chance that you might hear the term “envelope rule” banded around over the coming months.

But what is it and how does it work?

The envelope rule, introduced with the addition of Continental Europeans to the match in 1979, comes into effect in the event that one of the players gets injured during the course of the contest and is unable to compete in Sunday’s final singles session.

• Check out what Team USA will be wearing in the 2018 Ryder Cup?

• What has happened to 2014 Ryder Cup star Victor Dubuisson?

In one of the more obscure Ryder Cup traditions, the opposing captain can select one player from his team that he would like not to compete. The nominated player is then matched up with the injured player and the match is recorded as a half.

There is, of course, a catch. The captains must place the name of their nominated player in an envelope prior to the start of the singles matches.

The names are a closely guarded secret and are only revealed if they are used. Captains hand them over when the singles draw is made and, if they are not required, the envelopes are destroyed so that no-one will ever know who the “benched” players would have been.

Tom Watson Lanny Wadkins

There have only been a few recorded instances of the envelope having been needed.

In 1991, Steve Pate was too sore from a traffic accident on the Wednesday of Ryder Cup week to play on the Sunday. European captain Bernard Gallacher had chosen to bench David Gilford, and so the Englishman sat out the match, with both teams getting a half-point.

• Bookie offers VERY short odds on this course hosting 2026 Ryder Cup

• Where is the 2018 Ryder Cup match taking place?

Most recently, in 1993, Lanny Wadkins offered to ‘take one for the team’ and actually volunteered himself for the envelope. Captain Tom Watson duly obliged and when Sam Torrance couldn’t play due to a sore left foot, Wadkins sat out the final session.

Incidentally, the same rule exists in the Presidents but not in the Solheim Cup.

Share this Article

share-logo
twitter-logo facebook-logo

Latest Videos See all videos right arrow

play button
2022 Driver Test | Which one is going in my bag?
Drivers
play button
The most powerful PING irons ever? | PING i525 review
Ping
play button
I'll be using the Vokey SM9 wedges... and you should too
Titleist
play button
The driver that has it all? | COBRA LTDx drivers REVIEWED!
Cobra
See all videos right arrow

Golf News

The Open Final Qualifying: Who’s in and who’s out?
DP World Tour and PGA Tour announce expanded alliance
Sandy Lyle retires injured during Open qualifying
Sergio Garcia reveals LIV team rebrand
"It p****s me off”: Jim Furyk rages at reporter

Other Top Stories

Tiger Woods: Inside his $41million Florida mansion
The very best pubs in St Andrews
The Scottish Golf Course Emoji Quiz!
24 lies every bad golfer tells
Doug Sanders: The extraordinary life of golf's original playboy

Quick Fault 'n' Fixes See all videos right arrow

play button
Get your alignment correct for more consistency
Watch
play button
Keep the clubface looking at the ball for as long as possible
Callaway
play button
Start the golf ball on your intended target line
Watch
play button
Don’t slap the ball
Watch
See all videos right arrow