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Augusta National has previously given Zach Johnson a green jacket. Today, it gave him a red face.

The 2007 Masters champion suffered the embarrassment of making contact with his ball on a practice swing. 

Two-time major-winner Johnson, 43, was preparing to hit his tee shot on the par-5 13th – statistically, the easiest hole on the course – when he got a little too close to his ball during his practice swing. 

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As a result, he hit it clean off the tee, sending the ball cannoning into the tee marker and ricocheting away. It came to rest just a few feet in front of him. 

Check out the footage below…

“Oh shit” indeed!

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It could have been worse for Johnson, however. A change to the rules, introduced at the start of this year, now allows for such accidents, meaning the Iowa man was able to replace his ball without penalty. 

Lucky man! 


author headshot

Michael McEwan is the Deputy Editor of bunkered and has been part of the team since 2004. In that time, he has interviewed almost every major figure within the sport, from Jack Nicklaus, to Rory McIlroy, to Donald Trump. The host of the multi award-winning bunkered Podcast and a member of Balfron Golfing Society, Michael is the author of three books and is the 2023 PPA Scotland 'Writer of the Year' and 'Columnist of the Year'. Dislikes white belts, yellow balls and iron headcovers. Likes being drawn out of the media ballot to play Augusta National.

Deputy Editor

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