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arbroath

angus

signature hole

‘The Dunes’ is the best hole on the course – a 182-yard par-3 that is protected by five deep pot bunkers protecting the front of its green. If you are looking to make up shots late in your round, the 16th at Arbroath isn’t a recommended option.

claim to fame

First impressions of the course would suggest that it wouldn’t provide much of a challenge to the accomplished golfer, but be aware of water. On no fewer than nine holes will you have to negotiate burns crossing the fairway.

top tip

The par-3s are extremely tricky. You don’t have to be a long hitter to play well round Arbroath, just imaginative, with a variety of holes throughout. With no less than six par threes on the card - the shortest being 159 yards and the longest 239 yards – par is a good score on them all.

description

Arbroath was originally designed by Old Tom Morris back in 1877 and later remodelled by James Braid in 1931, and it hasn’t changed much since. The fairways are routed out and back alongside the railway line that runs down the coast, and the only two par fives on the card sit adjacent to each other and contain a drainage ditch that will catch errant shots all day long. The ever-present ‘sea breeze’ makes Arbroath links a challenge to all.

ardeer

ayrshire

signature hole

Dog leg hole with a burn running alongside you – the 9th hole at Ardeer will stay in your memory for a while. Especially if you hit a birdie and stay out of the burn!

claim to fame

The 4th oldest course in Ayrshire after Troon and Prestwick and Prestwick St Nicholas.

top tip

The 5th hole which is a monster par 5 will challenge you early in your round. Don’t let it intimidate you – out of bounds runs all the way up the right hand side, so play conservatively and live to fight another day.

description

A balanced parkland course with stunning views over the Clyde estuary. The tee shots are fair and straightforward, a few blind approach shots but the greens are challenging. The course is in pristine condition – especially the greens. Plenty of changes in elevation mean very appealing approach shots to the green. This is a very friendly course and we’re sure you’ll enjoy a warm welcome.

deer park

livingston

signature hole

8th - It may be the longest hole on the course but it also offers the greatest chance of a birdie. A good drive and solid second shot carrying the fairway bunker and there's a chance of making the green in two.

claim to fame

Deer Park is home to the prestigious annual Deer Park Masters, one of the most successful events on the PGA in Scotland's Tartan Tour.

top tip

On the closing hole, take the 3-wood out for accuracy to avoid the trees on the left. Take out your driver and you're asking for trouble.

description

One of the top golf courses in the Lothians, Deer Park was established as recently as 1978 but has now reached full maturity. A friendly club situated between Glasgow and Edinburgh, it has a tree-lined front nine with water hazards and well-positioned bunkers, while the back nine is played over more challenging and undulating terrain.

dougalston

milngavie

signature hole

18th - What better way to finish your round than a stunning par-3? That's what awaits here at Dougalston - but it isn't all plain sailing, with water on the far right and bunkers on both sides of the green.

claim to fame

The former Esporta Golf Course has a country club setting which is set within the heart of 300 acres of beautiful woodland.

top tip

The first requires a tee shot over a large pond. If you're feeling brave, lash one over the trees and you could give yourself an eagle chance.

description

Dougalston offers the ultimate golfing challenge just a ten-minute drive from Glasgow. The par-71 course, which is of championship standard, was designed by Commander Harris in 1975 and is set in the heart of 300 acres of beautiful woodland. He made excellent use of the natural woodland to create mature tree-lined fairways, while incorporating water features on several holes to give them considerable beauty. Great holes and greens await, and there's plenty of wildlife to enjoy, too.

dragon's tooth

ballachulish

signature hole

The 9th/18th is the best of the excellent par-threes – a 198-yard effort through the gap in the trees, over the stream and over the road. Plus, a bunker is to be avoided at the front of the green.

claim to fame

Dragons Tooth is regularly described as a hidden gem and it was given that fine accolade of being rated the best nine-hole course in Scotland by none other than bunkered magazine.

top tip

Take someone along with you that has never played before or who has fell out of love with the game. Golfers of all abilities are more than welcome – included first timers and complete amateurs – and they will be hooked by this wonderful layout.

description

Opened in 2001, Dragon’s Tooth golf course is an 18-tee, nine-hole layout at Ballachulish on an undulating, tree-lined estate at the entrance to the mighty Glencoe. If you are in the Highlands looking for a great round near Fort William or Oban, the course is ideal. It boats fantastic USGA greens allowing all year round play. Mature trees of all kinds enhance the edges of the fairway and visitors such as the fox and the deer can be found.

duns

berwickshire

signature hole

The last of the par-3s on the card is the most demanding, especially into a head or cross wind. ‘Wellrig Burn’ requires you to carry the ball over the picturesque burn that winds its way in front, and the 17th at Duns has wrecked many a good score.

claim to fame

Initially, the course included what is now a field at the top of the present course. However, the members soon realised that target practice from an adjoining rifle range made putting on the third green rather hazardous.

top tip

The greens are faster than expected and the course is longer than expected. The course is renowned for being in excellent condition all-year round, especially the greens. And the par-threes play a lot longer than expected, especially into the wind.

description

Duns Golf Club is a course designed sympathetically to blend in with the spectacular, rolling landscape of the Scottish Borders. The 18 holes are naturally beautiful and a real pleasure to play. It can be found at the foot of the Hardens Hill, with stunning views of the countryside and south to the Cheviot Hills across the Tweed Valley, and you will play a course that is superb value for money.

harburn

west calder

signature hole

‘Question Mark’ is an unforgettable par-3. Measuring just 127-yards, the 15th at Harburn is protected by trees on the right and gullies to the front, left and rear, where you’re aiming for a pulpit green that slopes from back to front. Three is a great score.

claim to fame

The story goes that, in the early 20th century, the Caledonian Railway Company rejected the site at Harburn in favour of the more northerly location of Gleneagles for the location of their new golf resort. Good result for both parties, we reckon.

top tip

Do not underestimate Harburn. Although it isn’t the longest course around, the variety of holes, hazards and elevation make it an equally enjoyable and challenging round, which requires you to plot your way around its many traps and hazards.

description

Situated two miles from West Calder, Harburn provide a peaceful, tranquil setting and challenging layout. At 870 feet above sea level, this course is perfectly located on the northern slope of the Pentland Hills, and it is a fine mix of moorland and parkland with many stands of mature trees dotted throughout the track. Holes five to ten are played on the opposite side of the main Edinburgh to Glasgow railway line and water can be found in the shape of the Bog Burn.

kilsyth lennox

kilsyth

signature hole

7th – The par-4 seventh hole is one of the course’s toughest holes, measuring 437 yards. Its fairway is very narrow with trees at either side and a couple of bunkers waiting to swallow up tee shots, while a water hazard runs all the way down the left side.

claim to fame

The course has the acclaim of being the only one in Scotland to have the unique feature of two dry stone bridges, the most recent of which was completed in 2014.

top tip

Make the most of Kilsyth Lennox’ excellent practice facilities before your round.It has a dedicated putting area, chipping and putting facilities adjacent to our first tee and a practice area which incorporates fairway approach areas, greenside bunkers, championship-size putting green, and a pitching zone.

description

The elevated location of Kilsyth Lennox, in the heart of the North Lanarkshire countryside between Glasgow and Stirling, provides a host of stunning viewpoints: from Goat Fell on the Isle of Arran in the west to the Forth Bridges in the east. Over the years, a number of changes have been made, most recently in 2002 under the watchful eye of architect Rocky Roquemore.

kintore

inverurie

signature hole

1st – Your skills will be put to the test from the word go at Kintore with a tough opening hole. It’s a par-3 that measures 226 yards from the white tees and, from the yellows, it still stretches to more than 200 yards.

claim to fame

The course, originally nine holes, was owned by a local landowner and leased through the existing Burgh Council. The original driver used by J.E. Sutherland MP on September 10, 1911 to open the club, is displayed in the clubhouse.

top tip

Accuracy is the name of the game here. That’s because the course, which is a mixture of picturesque parkland and tree-lined holes, is criss-crossed by burns, putting course management at the top of attributes required to succeed.

description

The spectacular course at Kintore covers a large area of ground from the Don basin, overlooked by the clubhouse, to mature woodland at the far perimeter. It’s not too long, measuring 6,126 yards from the medal tees. As well as a fine test of golf, players will also enjoy brilliant views over the River Don, stretching to Bennachie in the Grampian Hills.

macdonald cardrona

borders

signature hole

7th - While the sixth is a fantastic driving hole, the seventh is probably the course's highlight. Requiring an accurate drive with trees on the right and bunkers to the left, the approach shot is even more of a challenge on this 402-yard par-4 to find an elevated, well-protected green.

claim to fame

The exclusive village of Cardrona was the first new community development in the Scottish Borders since the 18th century.

top tip

Be very careful on the par-5 sixth hole as slightly wayward drives have the habit of finding their way into the nearby burn.

description

Built on a delightful piece of land, where the valley meets the River Tweed, the 18-hole Championship Course at the Macdonald Cardrona Hotel Golf & Country Club is as fantastic as it is formidable. It is just over ten-years-old, having opened to the public in 2001, and it is characterised by several large bunkers and gently undulating, tricky greens. Accuracy over length is, without question, the principle requirement for scoring well on it. One of the finest resort courses that Scotland has to offer, Cardrona is a perfect place to go.

macdonald linden hall

northumberland

signature hole

13th - While there are some quite memorable par-3s at Linden Hall, the signature hole has to be this real risk-and-reward par-5. Measuring 556 yards, it includes a double dogleg and tests your game to its limits.

claim to fame

The only English course in this year's sub offer, it offers panoramic views of the Cheviots, Coquet Island and the Northumberland coastline.

top tip

With water coming into play on nine of the holes, it's safe to say that accuracy and positioning is absolutely vital on this course.

description

Fancy crossing the border for one of your rounds of golf? Just a half hour drive from the Scottish border, a round at Macdonald Linden Hall Golf & Country Club will be one you won't forget. The 18-hole championship course is one of the best tests of golf that Northumberland has to offer. Spread across a large private estate near Morpeth, it is distinguished by wide, undulating, USGA specification greens. If you negotiate the many water and sand hazards, you will put yourself in prime position to post an impressive score.

machrihanish dunes

argyll

signature hole

The 17th is a fantastic hole, with a yawning chasm filling with rare orchids where you simply cannot walk that can be found just short of the green. If you land in this, a drop and a penalty stroke is required, which makes this par-four so difficult.

claim to fame

When neighbouring Machrihanish Golf Club’s clubhouse tragically went up in flames last year, Machrihanish Dunes kindly allowed all of its members access to its clubhouse and facilities whilst plans were made to restore the clubhouse. An extremely kind gesture.

top tip

Give any feedback you have, positive or negative, and you can be sure that the club will listen. Golfers had complained about long walks between holes, length of the rough and excessive blindness. Therefore, in 2011, the club decided to re-position tees, create new paths and a go through a programme of rough management.

description

Machrihanish Dunes is quickly becoming a golf destination to rival the best in the world. Set against the Atlantic Ocean on Scotland’s west coast, the course shares stunning views with neighbouring Machrihanish, which was laid out in 1879. Over 100 years later, course designer David McLay Kidd realised a lifelong dream to build a second course and it certainly hasn’t disappointed. The layout allows you the unique chance to create and craft golf shots just as the golfers of Scotland did centuries ago.

murrayshall

perthshire

signature hole

Standout holes include the tree-lined par-3 eighth, which demands a solidly struck long iron, and the par-5 17th, which runs down the hillside to a green that is encircled by small trees.

claim to fame

Murrayshall nestles within 350 acres of beautiful, rolling countryside and, located just five minutes from Scotland’s ancient capital, Perth, is unquestionably one of Scotland’s finest golf resorts.

top tip

Murrayshall has a 41-bedroom hotel on-site and with numerous activities to enjoy such as falconry, archery, fishing and the nine-hole Lynedoch course, there’s an opportunity to enjoy a relaxed weekend away in the Perthshire countryside.

description

The Murrayshall Course is an idyllic 18-hole championship parkland course that meanders its way around a beautiful countryside estate through large pine trees, offering golfers the perfect combination of an enthralling layout, impeccable course conditions and stunning panoramic views. Measuring 6,120 yards from the back tees, the course presents a stern challenge for the most accomplished golfers, while its wide fairways and generous greens guarantee enjoyment regardless of your skill level.

moffat golf club

dumfriesshire

signature hole

The signature hole , is undoubtedly the par-3 ninth, called Port Arthur. It consists of a blind shot over a high rock face down onto a hidden green. Visitors regularly comment on the steepness of the hole but also the enjoyment of trying to master it.

claim to fame

Often referred to as being ‘short and sweet’, Moffat is nothing of the sort. At under 5,000 yards off the yellow tees, it is as challenging a short course you will find in the area.

top tip

Don’t believe you have witnessed the best hole on the course until you visit the last: a driveable par-4 with breathtaking panoramic views. The ambitious will go for the green - but be aware of the burn running across the green - which could make or break your round.

description

This ultra-scenic course sits in the heart of the southern uplands in Scottish border country. Moffat is over 130 years old, as it was founded in 1884, and Ben Sayers was invited to design the 18-hole course in 1904. Despite its lack of yardage, it is hugely enjoyable to play and you will be guaranteed a warm welcome, as well as some friendly advice from the clubs steward on blind tee shots and avoiding the burn.

pitreavie

dumfermline

signature hole

The 13th hole is lovely with a green surrounded by big mature oak trees.

claim to fame

One of the many benefits of living in Scotland is we get to play courses designed by internationally recognized golf architects like Alister MacKenzie - right on our doorstep. Alister MacKenzie? Dr MacKenzie designed Augusta National with Bobby Jones.

top tip

Despite being a parkland course, there are some firm fairways and links style shots needed on a couple of holes.

description

You're playing on a course designed by Alister MacKenzie... feel the history as you step on the first tee. Pitreavie is a great course, undulating and in a parkland setting. Trees, burns, undulations, dog legs, blind shots, two and three tiered greens - this course has it all. It has Alister's fingerprints all over it. The greens are excellent, quite simply you will have a ball.

prestwick st. cuthbert

south ayrshire

signature hole

Although there isn’t necessarily a signature hole, Prestwick St Cuthbert contains no less than nine doglegs, which is truly a unique element of golf courses in Scotland.

claim to fame

Founded in 1899, the course was given a grand opening with an exhibition match between John Panton, Eric Brown, Dai Rees and Peter Alliss – not a bad fourball to open up your new club

top tip

Although the course is pretty flat and easy walking, many of the greens are elevated and quite small so it can be tricky to hold with your approach. Also, care has to be given to the doglegs, because you can’t afford to be blocked in behind the tree-lined fairways.

description

Prestwick St Cuthbert Golf Club moved to its existing course in 1963, after making way for the development of Prestwick Airport. Since its promising start, a lot has happened to help improve this parkland course, such as thousands of trees being planted that have now reached maturity. The course now has its own identity as a fabulous mature course, with picturesque fairways and excellent greens.

royal musselburgh

east lothian

signature hole

14th - Named 'The Gully', this 127-yard hole looks to be fairly straightforward but anything short will be gobbled up by the large valley from which the hole gets its name, leaving an almost vertical 50-yard blind pitch.

claim to fame

Members at Royal Musselburgh compete annually for the Old Club Cup which, dating back to 1774, is the oldest trophy played for in the world.

top tip

With only four of the 14 par-4s measuring more than 400 yards, distance is not the main consideration here - it's the precision off the tee and accuracy of the approach.

description

A warm welcome is guaranteed at Royal Musselburgh GC which, situated on the outskirts of Prestonpans, is recognised as the fifth oldest golf club in the world with the Old Club Cup, competed for every year at the club since 1774, the oldest trophy still competitively played for in the world. At the start of the famous stretch of golf courses on the East Lothian coast, this James Braid designed beauty is always kept in immaculate condition and comes alive heading down the stretch. The 149-yard par-3 14th is a particular highlight, with golfers having to carry a 30ft gully and position their ball on a narrow green surrounded by bunkers. Only four of the 14 par-4 holes are longer than 400 yards, giving players the chance to achieve green in regulation at most, but distance isn't the main consideration at this parkland gem, precision off the tee and accuracy of the approach are what matters most..

strathmore

perthshire

signature hole

5th – The fifth hole is a challenging par-5 that requires a 160-yard carry over water from the whites. It’s certainly not one for the faint-hearted. The four par-3s, meanwhile, sum up the variety on offer throughout the course, ranging from 122 to 224 yards.

claim to fame

Voted 2017 ‘Scotland’s Best Golf Experience’ at the Scottish Golf Tourism Awards in the Best Value Under £50 Category, Strathmore Golf Centre has something for everyone and has rightly gained a reputation as ‘The Friendly Place to Play Golf’.

top tip

As well as the Rannaleroch Course, there is also the adjoining nine-hole Leitfie Links, which is ideal for beginners or as a warm-up for the main course with seven par-3s ranging from 83 to 212 yards.

description

With beautiful south facing views over the Vale of Strathmore and free draining terrain, Strathmore is a proud, successful centre. It comprises the magnificent 18-hole Rannaleroch Course, nine-hole Leitfie Links Course, floodlit driving range, short game area, practice putting green, and a clubhouse, all in a stunning Perthshire location. The Rannaleroch Course is set in undulating parkland and is being continually improved year-on-year. Designed by John Salvesen, it has already been described as ‘a classic’.

the roxburghe

borders

signature hole

The par-five 14th hole has received high praise indeed from none other than Sam Torrance: “Roxburghe’s signature hole, The Viaduct, is my favourite 14th tee in Scotland. It’s such a beautiful hole in such a glorious setting.”

claim to fame

Although the course only opened in1997, it has already played host to some big events, such as the Scottish Seniors Open and the host of European Tour Q-School.

top tip

If you can, enjoy the full experience at Roxburghe Hotel and Golf Course. Set in the beautiful Scottish Borders, the historic hotel features a 20-bedroom luxury hotel that is only an hour’s drive from Edinburgh and Newcastle. With 60 new lodges set to built on the surrounding estate, it is a must-visit golf estate.

description

Roxburghe is undoubtedly one of the most accessible top-quality golf destinations in Scotland. And with the course being designed by renowned golf course architect Dave Thomas, you’re sure to play an outstanding championship course. He has created a wonderful mix of holes using the contours of the landscape and used dramatic water hazard and clever bunkering to spectacular effect. It is well maintained with vibrant green grass and the friendly, outgoing staff makes you want to come back every time.

torwoodlee

borders

signature hole

13th – This 420-yard par-4 called ‘Buckholm View’ is an absolute cracker. It doglegs down towards a putting surface that is shared by the eighth hole – one of two double greens on the course.

claim to fame

The club has been voted the most friendly and most visited course many times in the last two decades by the local golf passport scheme customers.

top tip

Measuring just over 6,000 yards, Torwoodlee is fairly modest in length but don’t let that deceive you, as many of the holes play uphill.

description

With over 100 years of history, Torwoodlee is a well-established course in the Scottish Borders. Flanked by the River Gala, the course winds through mature woodland and rolling parkland. Past captain and life member Robin Brydon has been a member for 40 years and has witnessed the club mature to now be ‘considered by many to be one of the finest courses in the south of Scotland’.

wigtownshire county

galloway

signature hole

2th - This par-4 starts with a daunting tee shot from an elevated tee box, with out of bounds tight all the way down the right-hand side. You’re normally hitting into a prevailing wind, which adds to the challenge of this enjoyable hole.

claim to fame

The course architect, Charlie Hunter, succeeded Old Tom Morris as the professional at Prestwick Golf Club. Hunter also designed the inaugural layouts at Machrihanish and Royal Troon.

top tip

If you’re looking to connect with an aspect of the game that has disappeared in the modern era, this course is certainly it, offering a basic, no frills links golf experience.

description

Situated on the shores of the scenic Luce Bay, Wigtownshire County is a wonderful links layout measuring slightly more than 6,000 yards. Built in 1894 and extended to 18 holes almost a century later in 1987, the course affords views across to the Isle of Man on a clear day but, when the wind blows, it is an altogether tougher test. The course make-up includes three par-3s, 14 par-4s and one par-5. A large practice area lies adjacent to the first tee and, because of the sandy soil base and proximity to the sea, there is rarely a problem with water lying on the course and winter greens are rarely used.

woll

borders

signature hole

17th – This hole is a real challenge. With a pond running the length of the right side of the fairway and a mature tree protecting the left side, there is plenty to test even the most experienced golfer. That’s before even reaching the green, which is surrounded by water to the front.

claim to fame

The New Woll Estate offers the complete Scottish golf experience as well a fantastic range of activities in the Ale Water Valley, including fishing, clay shooting, horse riding and a whisky distillery tour.

top tip

If you enjoy The Woll, which we’re sure you will, it’s worth knowing that all guests staying on the estate in its luxury self-catering properties benefit from FREE golf for the duration of their stay.

description

The Woll is one of the most popular clubs in the Scottish Borders and no wonder, with continued development of the course and a first-class clubhouse with award-winning restaurant. Set in its own valley near the town of Selkirk, the Woll Estate – with its mature trees, ponds, river and woodland – is the perfect setting. Over the last few years, the course has seen 14 of its 18 holes redeveloped with new greens, surrounds, bunkers and tees being redeveloped