The R&A introduce new rule over TV call-ins

Rulesof Golf

The R&A and USGA have issued a new Decision on the Rules of Golf to limit the use of video evidence in the game - but won't stop TV viewers calling in infringements.

Decision 34-3/10, which comes into effect immediately, follows the recent ruling at the ANA Inspiration, where Lexi Thompson (below) was given a four-stroke penalty in her final round due to an infringement spotted by a TV viewer the previous day. She ended up losing the tournament in a play-off.

It addresses two situations where Rules committees will be able to limit the use of video and overrule penalties.

Read more - Lexi shambles 'should never been allowed to happen'

Lexi Thompson

Situation 1

When video reveals evidence that could not reasonably be seen with the 'naked eye'.

The first standard states ‘the use of video technology can make it possible to identify things that could not be seen with the naked eye’. An example includes a player who unknowingly touches a few grains of sand in taking a backswing with a club in a bunker when making a stroke.

If the committee concludes that such facts could not reasonably have been seen with the naked eye and the player was not otherwise aware of the potential breach, the player will be deemed not to have breached the Rules, even when video technology shows otherwise.

Read more - 11 times TV viewers impacted golf tournaments

Rulesof Golf1

Situation 2

When players use their reasonable judgment to determine a specific location when applying the Rules.

The second standard applies when a player determines a spot, point, position, line, area, distance or other location in applying the Rules, and recognises that a player should not be held to the degree of precision that can sometimes be provided by video technology. Examples include determining the nearest point of relief, or replacing a lifted ball.

So long as the player does what can reasonably be expected under the circumstances to make an accurate determination, the player’s reasonable judgment will be accepted, even if later shown to be wrong by the use of video evidence.

Immediately following the announcement, the LPGA released the following statement.

Martin Slumbers, chief executive of The R&A, said: “We have been considering the impact of video review on the game and feel it is important to introduce a Decision to give greater clarity in this area.

“Golf has always been a game of integrity and we want to ensure that the emphasis remains as much as possible on the reasonable judgment of the player rather than on what video technology can show.”

Share this Article

share-logo
twitter-logo facebook-logo

Latest Videos See all videos right arrow

play button
TITLEIST VOKEY SM8 WEDGES REVIEW – How important are fresh grooves?
Vokey
play button
G710 vs G410 vs i500 – Which PING iron is longest?
Ping
play button
14 CLUB CHALLENGE - THE AMATEUR EDITION!
14 Club Challenge
play button
COBRA SPEEDZONE DRIVERS – Are these Cobra’s best ever?
Cobra
See all videos right arrow

Golf News

"Mindless idiots!" - Scots course hit by vandals during lockdown
Ex Ryder Cup captain's house destroyed by fire
Scots club seeks support in survival fight
"No lessons, no comps, no customers" - The life of a club pro in lockdown
Report: Another major POSTPONED due to coronavirus

Other Top Stories

Tiger Woods puts new irons in the bag
New Fife golf course gets go ahead
REVIEW - Adare Manor, Ireland's rejuvenated masterpiece
Win a spot in the ASI Scottish Open Pro-Am with Hilton
Padraig Harrington targets 2020 Ryder Cup captaincy

Quick Fault 'n' Fixes See all videos right arrow

play button
Keep your left arm straight
Watch
play button
A lesson for cack-handed golfers
Watch
play button
Stand closer to the golf ball at address
Callaway
play button
Peter Barber’s advice for older golfers
Callaway
See all videos right arrow